Magic Cubes - Order 6

Search


Magic squares and cubes of oddly even order, that is 4m+2, are notorious for being more difficult to construct. That undoubtedly accounts for the fact that my survey of published magic cubes revealed few cubes of order 6. Also there was not much variation of features in those I did discover. Following are seven from a total of 14 cubes in my collection.

Violle - 1838

Not magic.

Kingery - 1909

Not magic. Six simple magic squares.

Sayles - 1910

Simple magic. Not associated. Magic cubelets.

Worthington - 1910

Simple magic. Six simple magic squares.

Abe - 1948

Pantriagonal (a rarity for order 6). Not associated.

Johnson - 1989

Semi-pantriagonal magic. Associated.

Hendricks - 1999

Magic, but not normal. Inlay for an order 10 magic cube.

Violle - 1838

This cube is not considered magic by present definition. Even though the 4 triagonals are correct, rows, columns and pillars are not.

The total of the 36 cells in each of the 24 square arrays (the 3 x 6 orthogonal and the 6 oblique) sum to 6 x 651 = 3906. Both diagonals of these 24 arrays also sum correctly to 651.

All 4 triagonals sum correctly to 651. None of the 18 planar squares have any rows or columns that sum to 651! Two of the oblique squares have all rows summing correctly and four have all columns summing correctly. This cube has exactly the same features as the Violle order 4 except it is not associated.

I - Top                         II                              III         
  1   32   33    4   35    6    187  188  207  208  191  210    193  200  201  202  197  198
 42   68   70   39   71   37     48   44   64   63   47   61    162  164  166  165  161  157
 78  107  106   75  104   73    120  119  136  135  116  133    126  131  130  129  122  121
109  143  142  111  140  114     79   83  100   99   80  102     85   95   94   93   86   90
150  176  177  148  179  145    156  152  171  172  155  169     54   56   57   58   53   49
181  215  213  184  212  186      7   11   27   28    8   30     13   23   21   22   14   18

IV                              V                               VI - Bottom        
 19   14   15   16   23   24    205  206  189  190  209  192     31    2    3   34    5   36
168  158  160  159  167  163     66   62   46   45   65   43    180  146  148  177  149  175
132  125  124  123  128  127    102  101   82   81   98   79    108   77   76  105   74  103
 91   89   88   87   92   96    133  137  118  117  134  120    139  113  112  141  110  144
 60   50   51   52   59   55    174  170  153  154  173  151     72   38   39   70   41   67
199  197  195  196  200  204     25   29    9   10   26   12    211  185  183  214  182  216

Par B. Violle, Traité complet des Carrés Magiques, 1837 (French), pp 539-542.

Kingery - 1909

This cube is not magic by current definition because no triagonals are correct.
6 horizontal planes are simple magic squares. All orthogonal lines (rows, columns and pillars) sum correctly to 651.

The special feature of this cube is the bent triagonals between corners of the cube. Start at 1 corner of a horizontal square and move toward the center of the cube, then back to the opposite corner of the starting square to get a bent diagonal.
However, unlike the bent triagonal cubes of order 4, this cube is not semi-pantriagonal.

Examples starting with the top square:
1 + 191 + 51 + 166 + 26 + 216 = 651 (planes 1, 2, 3)
1 + 119 + 130 + 87 + 98 + 216 = 651 (planes 1, 6, 5)

There are 2 bent triagonals for each pair of corners for each plane.

I - Top                         II                              III         
  1  215  214    3  212    6    198   20   21  196   23  193     37  179  178   39  176   42
210    8  208  207   11    7     25  191   27   28  188  192    174   44  172  171   47   43
204  203   15   16   14  199     31   32  184  183  185   36    168  167   51   52   50  163
 13   17  201  202  200   18    186  182   34   33   35  181     49   53  165  166  164   54
 12  206    9   10  209  205    187   29  190  189   26   30     48  170   45   46  173  169
211    2    4  213    5  216     24  197  195   22  194   19    175   38   40  177   41  180
IV                              V                               VI- Bottom        
145   71   70  147   68  150    144   74   75  142   77  139    126   92   93  124   95  121
 66  152   64   63  155  151     79  137   81   82  134  138     97  119   99  100  116  120
 60   59  159  160  158   55     85   86  130  129  131   90    103  104  112  111  113  108
157  161   57   58   56  162    132  128   88   87   89  127    114  110  106  105  107  109
156   62  153  154   65   61    133   83  136  135   80   84    115  101  118  117   98  102
 67  146  148   69  149   72     78  143  141   76  140   73     96  125  123   94  122   91

H. M. Kingery, A Magic Cube of Six, The Monist, 19, 1909, pp434-441
W. S. Andrews, Magic Squares & Cubes, 2nd edition, Dover Publ. 1960 (1917), pp 189-196.

Sayles - 1910

This is a simple magic cube but has the unique feature that if the cube is divided into 27 2x2x2 cubelets, the six faces of each cubelet and 2 of the 6 diagonal planes will each sum the same value. These 27 values step from 382 to 486.

For example, the top left 2x2x2 cubelet
The six faces:                                             Two diagonal planes

  4    4    4  193  139   85       4   85
 85   85  139  112  166  166     166  139
166  112   58   31   31   31      31   58
139  193  193   58   58  112     193  112
394  394  394  394  394  394     394  394

I - Top                         II                              III         
  4  139  161   26  174  147    193   58   80  215   39   66     18  153  136  163   23  158
 85  166  107  188   93   12    112   31  134   53  120  201     99  180    1   82  104  185
 98  152  138    3  103  157    125   71   57  192  130   76    181   19   95  176  171    9
179   17   84  165  184   22     44  206  111   30   49  211    100  154  149   14   90  144
183   21   13  175   89  170     48  210  202   40  116   35    167    5  108  189  172   10
102  156  148   94    8  143    129   75   67  121  197   62     86  140  162   27   91  145
IV                              V                               VI - Bottom        
207   72   55   28  212   77    155   20  150   15  169  142     74  209   69  204   34   61
126   45  190  109  131   50    101  182   96  177   88    7    128   47  123   42  115  196
 46  208  122   41   36  198      6   87  106  187   92  173    195  114  133   52  119   38
127   73   68  203  117   63    141  168  160   25   11  146     60   33   79  214  200   65
 32  194  135   54   37  199    151   16  137   83  105  159     70  205   56  110  132   78
113   59   81  216  118   64     97  178    2  164  186   24    124   43  191   29   51  213

H. A. Sayles, A Magic Cube of Six, The Monist, 20, 1910, pp 299-303
W. S. Andrews, Magic Squares & Cubes, 2nd edition, Dover Publ. 1960 (1917), page 197.

Worthington - 1910

A simple magic cube but the 2 central orthogonal planes in each direction are simple magic. These magic squares may be transformed to the surface of the cube by changing the order of the planes from 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 to 3, 2, 1, 6, 5, 4. By Trumps definition, this would then be an s-magic cube.
Four oblique arrays of this cube have all columns correct, 2 have rows correct. This cube is not associated.

I - Top                         II                              III         
147  146   40   38  141  139    150  151   33   35  140  142    115  114  196  200   15   11
149  145   36   39  138  144    148  152   37   34  143  137    113  116  199  195   12   16
136  135  163  165   27   25    129  130  166  164   30   32      7    8  106  109  209  212
132  134  168  162   26   29    133  131  161  167   31   28      6    5  112  107  211  210
 45   43  123  122  160  158     44   46  126  127  153  155    208  205   17   18  104   99
 42   48  121  125  159  156     47   41  128  124  154  157    202  203   21   22  100  103

IV                              V                               VI - Bottom        
118  119  197  193   10   14     58   59   96   95  170  173     63   62   89   90  175  172
120  117  194  198   13    9     64   61   92   94  171  169     57   60   93   91  174  176
  2    1  111  108  216  213    186  185   50   56   88   86    191  192   55   49   81   83
  3    4  105  110  214  215    187  189   53   51   84   87    190  188   52   54   85   82
201  204   24   23   97  102     80   78  181  177   66   69     73   75  180  184   71   68
207  206   20   19  101   98     76   79  179  178   72   67     77   74  182  183   65   70

John Worthington, A Magic Cube of Six, The Monist, 20, 1910, pp 303-309
W. S. Andrews, Magic Squares & Cubes, 2nd edition, Dover Publ. 1960 (reprint of 1917 edition), page 205.

Abe - 1948

This cube is pantriagonal magic and is not associated. It has no other special characteristics.

However, it is the only pantriagonal cube I have seen for order 6 except for a rotated (disguised) version that appeared on a site by F. Poyo (which is no longer available).   

I - Top                         II                              III         
  1  144   14  198  118  176    141  173  192  121   17    7    161   67   88   47  186  102
140  172  190  122   18    9    178    6  125   12  193  137     66  107   51  187   83  157
180    5  126   10  194  136      2  142   13  197  120  177    103  156  182   87   52   71
 28  135   59  153  109  167    132  164  147  112   62   34    206   22   79   38  213   93
131  163  145  113   63   36    169   33  116   57  148  128     21   98   42  214   74  202
171   32  117   55  149  127     29  133   58  152  111  168     94  201  209   78   43   26

IV                              V                               VI - Bottom        
 64  108   50  189   82  158    105  155  183   85   53   70    179    4  124   11  195  138
104  154  181   86   54   72    160   69   89   48  184  101      3  143   15  196  119  175
162   68   90   46  185  100     65  106   49  188   84  159    139  174  191  123   16    8
 19   99   41  216   73  203     96  200  210   76   44   25    170   31  115   56  150  129
 95  199  208   77   45   27    205   24   80   39  211   92     30  134   60  151  110  166
207   23   81   37  212   91     20   97   40  215   75  204    130  165  146  114   61   35

From Mutsumi Suzuki's Web site at http://mathforum.com/te/exchange/hosted/suzuki/MagicSquare.html

Johnson - 1989

This is an associated magic cube and so is also semi-pantriagonal. 24 planar arrays have rows and columns correct. Oblique arrays; 4 with columns correct, 2 with rows correct.  

I - Top                         II                              III         
 32  156  199  140   48   76    192  127   53   81   19  179     55  104   12  166  194  120
 42   85   26  150  214  134     13  173  186  121   65   93    206  114   70   98    6  157
190  128   54   79   20  180     59  108    7  167  195  115     36  151  200  144   46   74
122  174  184   14   63   94    207    1   71   99  112  161     40   86  135  148  212   30
 57  106  116  168  196    8    139  155  201   34   47   75    188   24   52   80  129  178
208    2   72  100  110  159     41   87  133  149  213   28    126  172  182   15   64   92

IV                              V                               VI - Bottom        
125  153  202   35   45   91    189    4   68   84  130  176     58  107  117  145  215    9
 39   88  137  165  193   29    142  170  183   16   62   78    209   21   49  101  111  160
187    5   69   82  131  177     56  105  118  146  216   10    123  154  203   33   43   95
143  171   73   17   66  181    102   22   50  210  109  158     37  197  138  163   89   27
 60  211  119  147  103   11    124  152   96   31   44  204     83    3   67  191  132  175
 97   23   51  205  113  162     38  198  136  164   90   25    141  169   77   18   61  185

A. W. Johnson, Jr. Normal Magic Cubes of Order 4m+2 (Letter to the Editor), JRM 21:2, 1989, 101-103.

Hendricks - 1999

This is an order-6 associated magic cube. It is not normal because it is an inlay and uses 216 of the numbers from 112 to 888. It occupies the central position of an order 10 simple magic cube. Parallel to each face of this cube are 2 inlaid simple magic squares as part of the shell surrounding the cube.
Although associated, it is NOT semi-pantriagonal, probably because it does not use consecutive numbers.

I - Top                         II                              III         
889  188  117  114  813  882    782  713  287  284  718  219    319  683  384  617  688  312
122  173  827  824  178  879    779  223  724  277  228  772    629  328  377  374  673  622
139  863  164  837  868  132    269  768  737  734  233  262    362  333  667  664  338  639
862  833  134  167  838  169    239  738  264  767  763  232    332  668  637  634  363  369
172  828  877  874  123  129    222  273  774  727  278  729    679  378  624  327  323  672
819  118  884  187  183  812    712  288  217  214  783  789    682  613  314  387  618  389

IV                              V                               VI - Bottom        
612  383  614  317  388  689    212  218  787  784  283  719    189  818  814  887  113  182
329  678  674  627  373  322    272  723  274  777  728  229    872  878  127  124  823  179
632  638  367  364  663  339    769  238  234  267  733  762    832  163  834  137  168  869
669  368  337  334  633  662    739  263  764  237  268  732    162  133  867  864  138  839
379  623  324  677  628  372    722  773  227  224  778  279    829  128  177  174  873  822
382  313  687  684  318  619    289  788  717  714  213  282    119  883  184  817  888  112

John R. Hendricks, Inlaid Magic Squares and Cubes, self-published, 1999, 0-9684700-1-7, pp 148-161.

This page was originally posted December 2002
It was last updated December 03, 2009
Harvey Heinz   harveyheinz@shaw.ca
Copyright © 1998-2009 by Harvey D. Heinz